+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: 90 degree bevelling bit-any good??

Hybrid View

  1. #1

    Default 90 degree bevelling bit-any good??

    I have been playing around with the idea of building a beveller for my boo strips.

    I found a 90 degree bevelling bit on the Grizzly site.

    Does it make a big difference if the bit is 90 degree instead of 60 degrees?

    Or is it just a bit more planning?

    Thanks for the input,
    Chris

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Clinton, MS
    Posts
    20

    Default

    I do not see how it could possibly fit in the planing form 60 degree groove. It might work if you were building quads.

  3. #3

    Default

    Well,

    It only has to lye on one side, so I was thinking that I could plain down the upper side and it would become 60 degree, once I got down to the planning forum.

    I was thinking of the strip as an over sized 60 degree that would have to be worked down to an actual 60 degree?

    Does this make sense, or am I just thinking way to far out of the box?

    Chris

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Elida, Ohio
    Posts
    1,702

    Default

    Most bevelers using router bits use a straight bit and have a 60 degree groove that the bamboo strip slides through. Place the outside of the strip on one side of the groove, then switch the outside of the strip to the other side of the groove and you have a 60 degree strip.

    That all being said, I would go for a Baginski style beveler shown here...

    http://classicflyrodforum.com/forum/...p?f=66&t=70844


    Brad
    "A woman drove me to drink and I didn't even have the decency to thank her."
    -W.C. Fields

  5. #5

    Default

    Hey Brad,

    Thanks for the great link, and pictures.

    I will defiantly consider that type of beveller!

    Chris

  6. #6

    Default

    I have been using a Baginski beveler for the last 15 rods. Not a very steep learning curve but it gets a bit exciting when one forgets to sharpen the end of a strip. Also keep control of the strip as it is going through the beveler so it doesn't become a projectile. I am not particularly fast but I can (and have) split a culm and bevelled the 18 strips into acceptable 60* prisms in an hour and a half. I could be much faster but I am only working with a Harbor Freight motor and it tends to bog down if I try to take too much off or try to feed it too fast. I strongly recommend you find the 36 or 40 grit paper to make your wheels; I tried it at first with 80 grit and got a lot of burning of the strips and the paper. Go over to Clarks and there is a fellow over there who makes the wheels. Good luck on your journey.
    formerly known as mcsteff (member since '98...)
    Last edited by Catspaw; 04-27-2017 at 02:47 AM.

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts