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Thread: Reeling in! Help!

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Frederick, MD
    Posts
    11

    Default Reeling in! Help!

    Okay, so I have just started fly fishing this year and have had 4 trout take my fly. Two of them I actually hooked in time, but while I was reeling in they got off. Here is my dilemma

    While casting upstream the fly comes back to you in the current. While that is happening I am continually pulling in fly line which is piling up directly beneath me. When a trout strikes I pull up on the fly rod and hook the trout.

    The problem is when I have to reel in the fly line beneath me. While I have the trout hooked I am reeling in the slack fly line beneath me and that is when the trout comes off.. what the heck am I doing wrong???

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    213

    Default

    Just strip the fish in. On any fish smaller than a couple pounds there's no reason to worry about using the reel at all. It's really just there to hold line on any rod under a 6wt and even on rods that big depending on how they are being used. If you hook a big fish thats pulling hard enough for you to worry about breaking the tippet, hold the line loose enough to let the fish take line when it wants to while you're stripping until you can either pull it in or it's taken enough slack line out to get onto your reel.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Woodland, CA USA
    Posts
    1,566

    Default

    another way to do it is thusly:

    When you are stripping line, before the fish hits, you should be holding the fly line in the finger (first or middle) of the rod hand. When the fish strikes, and you don't want to have to deal with all the slack underneath you, reach out with your pinky finger on the rod hand. Grab the line with it, above the spool. Remembering to keep the fish tight to the rod with your first or middle finger, reel like mad, keeping tension with your pinky. This is a quick way to get larger trout on the reel, if they aren't taking line fast enough.

    MAO
    ‎"Trust, but verify" - Russian Proverb, as used by Ronald Reagan

  4. #4

    Default

    That's a good way to practice catch and release. But, both suggestions are great. You don't really need to put the fish on the reel unless it wants to take a run. Then it's fun to see your backing.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    NE Gwinnett Co., GA
    Posts
    5,715

    Default

    All of the above is good advise. If you are going to give line to a fish and work to get it on the reel, keep tension on the line as you let it go with the fish, keep your rod tip up to act as a shock absorber for surges or if you have knot in your line and have to stop the fish unexpectedly. I don't have great expensive reels but all have decent drag systems. I have never caught any really large trout but have a 7.5 grass carp; a couple of 5.5 largemouth and a pretty good sized channel cat on my 3 wt. because I had decent drags on the reel.
    Want to hear God laugh? Tell him Your plans!!!

  6. #6
    Cold Guest

    Default

    Like the others have said, for any trout that you've got the appropriate weight rod for, getting the fish "on the reel" will not usually be necessary until you get to fish that require a 6 or 7wt rod. For my part, when I hook a small stream trout, I just pinch the line against the front end of the grip with my index finger, stripping line in as the fish tires. If he takes a run, its usually a short one, and I can just "unstrip" the line as necessary.

    Recently, though, I've started going to ultralight gear, fishing my new 1wt for most of my local fishing. This light rod is easily contended with by even a 12-14" fish. In a true small stream (to me, of course...about 20' or less across), there's simply no room for the fish to run, and I still can get by with the occasional "unstrip". In a somewhat larger creek, or if I hook a bass in a local pond, I've got to resort to reeling in the slack like crazy while maintaining tension on the fish until I get him on the reel. Its intense for a few moments, but that's a part of my fun when fishing. That realization that this is a big fish on the line, and the odds are pretty even...what a great feeling.

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